Project: 78c3c6f0-2a05-43e6-86b2-610b0be954b8

Metadata Format
Project Title
Geodiversity Linkages Between Alaska's Federal Conservation Estate
Description
Model landscape connectivity through the most efficient, but permeable paths for moving between the contiguous areas of each geodiversity type were identified by modelling the path of least resistance.
Point of Contact(s)
LCC Network Data Steward
LCC Network Data Manager
lccdatasteward@fws.gov
Northwest Boreal Landscape Conservation Cooperative
Northwest Boreal Landscape Conservation Cooperative
Dawn Magness
Research Scientist
P.O. Box 2139; Ski Hill Rd
Soldotna, Alaska 99669
V: +1 907 2602814
dawn_magness@fws.gov

Project Abstract

The geodiversity approach uses topography to define landscape features. Topography can be a proxy for ecological function. For example, topography influences the solar radiation available for plants and animals, the soil characteristics through the likelihood for erosion and deposition, and the characteristics of hydrologic features. Therefore, similar geodiversity types should have the potential for similar ecological function even as the climate changes. We classified the landscape into three topographic feature categories: canyons, ridges, and slopes. Each topographic feature was then clustered into distinct geodiversity types. Slopes were clustered into groups using elevation, slope angle, and yearly solar radiation. Solar radiation varies based on latitude, aspect, and topographic shading. Ridges and canyons were clustered based on elevation and slope angle. Solar radiation was not used for ridges or canyons because each side would mirror the other increasing the complexity of the landscape characterization (Brost 2010). For each geodiversity type (e.g. gentle, low-elevation, warm slopes), large contiguous areas of that type were identified within the conservation estate (defined as NPS and USFWS lands). The most efficient, but permeable paths for moving between the contiguous areas of each geodiversity type were identified by modelling the path of least resistance. The final landscape linkage is a union of this least cost pathway for all geodiversity types found within the conservation estate.

Supplemental Info: None Provided.

Project Links

Project Keywords

  • ISO 19115 Topic Category (isoTopicCategory):
    • biota,
    • boundaries,
    • environment,
    • geoscientificInformation
  • Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Science Keywords (theme):
    • LANDSCAPE,
    • LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY
  • End User Types - Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCC End User Type):
    • Academics & scientific researchers,
    • Conservation NGOs,
    • Federal resource managers,
    • Policy makers & regulators,
    • Private land owners,
    • Regional & county planners,
    • State agencies,
    • Tribes
  • Project Category - Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCC Project Category):
    • Conservation Design,
    • Conservation Planning,
    • Data Acquisition and Development,
    • Data Management and Integration,
    • Decision Support,
    • Informing Conservation Delivery,
    • Monitoring,
    • Population & Habitat Evaluation/Projection
  • Deliverable Types - Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCC Deliverable):
    • Datasets/Database

Associated Products

ID Title Metadata Link
1bb99b2d-da38-490d-9c35-39df2836bd65 Alaska Protected Lands Connectivity Study mdJSON ISO 19115-2 HTML